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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Vacation

Minot Memories will be on Vacation from August 1 until August 18….


I will be at our lake cabin in Minnesota. 

If internet connections allow, I will post from the lake

Puppy Dog

 One story of how Puppy Dog Coulee was named . Puppy Dog referred to a watering hole or pond in the coulee just a bit south and east of where the Highway patrol office is now. This would be just off 6th Street Southeast. The pond in the 30’s, was deep enough that his horse had to swim across when he was riding. In the drought years it always had water, the watering hole never dried up. Supposedly the Indians named it Puppy Dog but he did not know why. At the turn of the century they would make camp at this spot and had about a mile walk into Minot. I am still looking for any information on how Puppy Dog Coulee got its name.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Dance Restrictions

From the Reporter on Nov. 13, 1912… For dancing the “bunny hug” and “grizzly” bear, which had been banned in many dance halls in the country, a young man was sentenced to 10 days in the Minot Jail. C. Younkin, assigned to special police duty at the Riverside Dance Hall, preferred a charge of disorderly conduct against the youth. The latter’s partner in the dance floor, who got away from the officer, was being sought.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Minot Made Potato Chips

 In 1933, a Minot native who lived in the northwest part of town figured out how to beat the depression. T.J. McIlhargey worked for the Great Northern Railroad for eighteen years. Since he was unemployed, he and his wife started making potato chips in the basement of their home. He sold the potato chips under the “Green Hill” label to over 40 retail establishments in Minot. In time he not only sold the potato chips, but he expanded into selling donuts also. They would process 2 to 3 bushels of potatoes a day, yielding up to 13 pounds of chips. The plan was to expand into other area communities with the chip and donut business.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Boston Store

Herman Gordon arrived in Minot in 1905 and opened a small tailor shop in town. His first shop was on First Street South West. Later he moved to Main Street and opened the Boston Store. Eventually, The Boston Store moved to First Street Southwest, just south of what is now the Federal Building. Herman was ten years old and still living in Russia when he “ went on the bench”. The term used at that time applied to learning the tailor’s trade. He learned from his father. After coming to America in 1902, he worked for three years as a tailor in Petrosky, Michigan before moving to Minot. Herman and his wife, Helen, lived at 613 East Central Avenue, or in what is now know as Eastwood Park.


Friday, July 25, 2014

Milk Protest - 1934

From January 15, 1934… Demonstrators entered two Minot grocery stores to protest the price of mile on their counters. Chain Grocery on 2nd St NW was visited by approximately 50 people. Minot Food Market, also on 2nd St, NW was visited by the same group. At the Chain Grocery store, the protesters dumped about 100 quarts of milk on the street. At Minot Food Market about 20 quarts of milk were dumped out in addition to a small amount of cream. The reason for the protest was these two stores were selling milk at a price lower than the group wanted. The average price for milk at that time was nine cents a quart. Chain Grocery was accused of selling milk four quarts for a quarter and at times seven cents a quart. Minot Food Market had a sign in the window stating “Free milk with the purchase of 50 cents of groceries. The group was representing the milkmen’s organization

Chain Food Store - North Second Street (North Broadway)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Thursday, July 24, 2014

JB Reed - Moving and Storage

JB Reed Transfer and Storage was one of the oldest operator of moving trucks in Minot. They got their first truck, a Winton, in 1911. The crank on this vehicle was on the side. After the driver cranked it and got it started, he would most likely have to run after and catch up to the moving truck. Eventually Reed Transfer went to using GMC and International trucks. Before that, some of the trucks they had were a Republic, an Overland and a Maxwell. In 1933 , Reed Transfer became the agents for Aero-Mayflower Moving out of Indianapolis. Cliff Reed was also a lover of fine cars. In 1934 when President Roosevelt was in Devils Lake, he was chauffeured by Cliff Reed in his Sport Model Buick. He was and his car also chauffeured the Mexican ambassador to the United States in 1935 when he was visiting Minot.