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Friday, July 25, 2014

Milk Protest - 1934

From January 15, 1934… Demonstrators entered two Minot grocery stores to protest the price of mile on their counters. Chain Grocery on 2nd St NW was visited by approximately 50 people. Minot Food Market, also on 2nd St, NW was visited by the same group. At the Chain Grocery store, the protesters dumped about 100 quarts of milk on the street. At Minot Food Market about 20 quarts of milk were dumped out in addition to a small amount of cream. The reason for the protest was these two stores were selling milk at a price lower than the group wanted. The average price for milk at that time was nine cents a quart. Chain Grocery was accused of selling milk four quarts for a quarter and at times seven cents a quart. Minot Food Market had a sign in the window stating “Free milk with the purchase of 50 cents of groceries. The group was representing the milkmen’s organization

Chain Food Store - North Second Street (North Broadway)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Thursday, July 24, 2014

JB Reed - Moving and Storage

JB Reed Transfer and Storage was one of the oldest operator of moving trucks in Minot. They got their first truck, a Winton, in 1911. The crank on this vehicle was on the side. After the driver cranked it and got it started, he would most likely have to run after and catch up to the moving truck. Eventually Reed Transfer went to using GMC and International trucks. Before that, some of the trucks they had were a Republic, an Overland and a Maxwell. In 1933 , Reed Transfer became the agents for Aero-Mayflower Moving out of Indianapolis. Cliff Reed was also a lover of fine cars. In 1934 when President Roosevelt was in Devils Lake, he was chauffeured by Cliff Reed in his Sport Model Buick. He was and his car also chauffeured the Mexican ambassador to the United States in 1935 when he was visiting Minot.

 

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Schaefer Barn

As told by Dan Schaefer…. Lumber loaded in Minot for barn built on W A Schaefer farm, Sitting on the wagon far right front is my grandfather. The farm is 7 miles southwest of Minot. My grandfather, farmed my dad, W J Schaefer farmed and I farmed. My Dad and I grew up on this farmstead and I still live there.W A Schaefer moved from Iowa in 1908 and bought the farmstead from a homesteader named Babst. When I would talk to people from my father’s generation and tell them where I live and farm, I would often hear the stories about the many barn dances they had attended in that barn. It is a very large barn, with a big hay mow. The 3 cupolas on the roof were attached to wooden vertical air shafts for ventilation to the main floor of barn. The barn was used for housing horses and cows in the horse drawn farming days. Loose hay was pulled up into the hay mow from wagons on the ground via a pulley and brought into the hay mow on a rail running at the top just under the roof. Hay was pulled in and moved into the hay mow and then dropped inside. The hay mow would be filled with loose hay, then pitch forked to main floor via holes in hay mow floor. Later in mechanized farming times small square bales were moved into the hay mow via electric chain bale elevators. The bales were stacked high inside by another electric elevator. Half of the main floor of the barn was converted for milking cows in early 1960's.



Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Iron Lung Arrives

In 1939 the Minot Junior Association of Commerce, headed  by Les Maupin, conducted a fundraising drive to raise money to purchase an Iron Lung or mechanical respirator for the City of Minot. The respirator, a Drinker-Collins type was fitted with a mechanical and manual operating equipment. Rules and regulations for the operating of the Iron Lung in emergency cases were adopted by the Minot City Council. The Iron Lung was presented to the city at a special ceremony held in the Minot High School Auditorium on August 16, 1939.

Monday, July 21, 2014

Traffic Signals come to Minot

A suspended stop and go signal was ordered for the City of Minot in August of 1939.  Some years before a post type signal was tried in Minot. It was located at the intersection of Main Street and Central Avenue. The use of this signal was discontinued as most drivers ignored it and a number of drivers ran into it. The installation of the signal light was an experiment at the intersection of 2nd Street and 4th Avenue Northwest, (now known as Broadway and 4th Avenue), at the north end of the overpass. The signal weighed about 115 pounds and was equipped with red, yellow and green lights. It was timed with 30 second intervals on the north-south lanes and 20 second intervals on the east-west lanes. The signal went into operation on September 16, 1939. Motorists were given time to get used to the signal. Violators were not arrested on the first day. The signal was in operation 7 days a week, (yes, Sundays included), from 7 am to 1 am. The experiment proved to be successful as signals were also ordered for: Central Avenue and Second Street West, Central Avenue and Main Street, Central Avenue and Third Street East, Main Street and First Avenue and Main Street and Fourth Avenue, (Burdick Expressway.) By the end of 1939, these additional signals were installed and operating.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Nelson Motors

Nelson Motors was located at 614 Second St NW. The business began as “Ted and Markies” repair shop. In 1940 they entered in the new car field. The owners were Mark Nelson and Ted Hugh. The business was known as Hugh-Nelson Motors. In 1960 Nelson and sons bought out the interest of Ted Hugh. The Rambler was the vehicle line the carried. Eventually the name was changed to Nelson Motors and the car line became American Motors. One of the popular vehicles in the late 60’s was the Javelin and the AMC. Both were sports cars and were meant to rival the Mustangs and Camaros.


Thursday, July 17, 2014

Gold Recovery Plant - 2nd attempt

Aug 26, 1938 – A gold recovery plant has been established east of Minot near the Mouse River by the Herman Hanson Syndicate. Soil travels up a conveyor belt to a circular drum. There it is washed and whirled. The coarse gravel is discarded and the finer material, carrying the gold content passes across a vibrating screen, which sifts the material even finer. Water pumped from the river, washes the screened material down into sluices where a series of riffles and special cloths trap the gold. The concentrate is then pit through a special electro-amalgamated process, which extracts the gold dust. Between 2,000 and 3,000 cubic yards of material will run through the plant daily.